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Castings (8)

Category: Castings

CAMSCANNER

CamScanner is a mobile app that allows iOS and Android devices to be used as image scanners. It allows users to ‘scan’ documents and share the photo as either a JPEG or PDF. This app is available free of charge on the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store.

https://www.camscanner.com/

ADOBE FILL & SIGN APP

Fill out and sign forms anytime and anywhere. Fill out PDF documents on your smartphones and tablet and share them directly with others – free with the Adobe Fill & Sign App.

Get it on Google Play
Download on the Apple App Store

SMALLPDF TOOLS

Make use of SmallPDF’s collection of PDF tools to process digital documents and streamline your workflow seamlessly.

https://smallpdf.com/pdf-tools

See also How to Electronically Sign PDF Documents Without Printing and Scanning Them

Category: Castings

Since Covid, many auditions are now carried out over Zoom – and I think they’re here to stay! So we have researched a couple of helpful articles to help you make the best impression out of this kind of meeting.

As well as reading the below links and watching the video…

  • Think about who will be in the room with you: ideally only the twins and one guardian. No other parents, siblings, and definitely no PETS!!!!
  • Choose a room you can close off from the rest of the house and don’t let anyone wander in and out;
  • Read the casting instructions carefully and be prepared;
  • Pay attention to the director and what’s being asked of you – parents: let your children respond;
  • Don’t fidget.

Instruction for Actor(s) auditioning

  1. Download ZOOM software applications for your desired device prior to the meeting. https://zoom.us/download
  2. For your Computer ‘Zoom Client for Meetings’ or for your Phone ‘Zoom Mobile Apps’
  3. You’ll be sent an invite email containing a link, which should take you straight into the waiting room for the meeting. Or you may need to use the meeting ID and password. (There is a “waiting room” function, so if you are not immediately let into the meeting it’ll be because there’s a slight delay, so please stay in waiting room and someone will then move you into the meeting when they are ready. It might be an idea to click to show the chat function, as if there is a delay,)
  4. When it is the time for your audition, please click on the link. It will open the ZOOM application, we think it should take you direct to meeting waiting room, but if it doesn’t you may need to enter the meeting ID and password when requested
  5. Once you join the meeting, please make sure that you ‘Start Video’ so the other participants can see you and that your audio is working so they can hear you clearly.
  6. Please note: All being well with the connection, the casting director will record your performance from ZOOM directly onto their computer as a record of your reading for exec producers not attending the meeting. This is purely used for casting purposes and then deleted.

Please read the following before setting up your Zoom call:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=zDWcArOo8P8%3Ffeature%3Doembed
Tags: castings, zoom
Category: Castings

A Covid backup will NOT be used unless the confirmed first choice has to pull out due to COVID, so essentially, the backup cast will be receiving a fee for remaining on stand by.

Category: Castings

We have been highly praised on the quality of our audition tapes, so let’s keep this up – please read the following BEFORE you start!

We often ask actors to submit a self-tape and have complied the following tips and tricks to ensure you submit a decent one.

Twins/triplets should always record together where possible!

Rarely these will replace an actual audition but may help a Casting Director decide to meet with you and keep you in the running.

self-taping can also help you prepare for a face-to-face audition – there’s no better way for you to judge your own on-camera audition technique than to watch it back[Puro Casting]

  • Smartphone technology has come a long way and is more than adequate for this purpose. However, make sure the phone is placed on a steady surface or tripod – never handheld – and used in landscape mode.
  • Choose your location and check your lighting in a test shoot. Preferably no distractions surrounding you or the viewer; a quiet, plain and closed room in your house will suffice.
  • Ensure your head and shoulders are framed nicely and the camera is stable and at eye level. Don’t fidget or wave your arms about.
  • Be prepared and be off-book (no paper in sight). Learn your lines, dress appropriately and avoid props.
  • Do not SHOUT and do not rush – take it slow, steady and confidently.
  • Begin by introducing yourself and stating who your agent is (“TV Twins”), name of the role and project you are auditioning for.
  • Submit only your best *one* take – we don’t have time to view all and decide for you! But you can send a separate slate or ident. We don’t need super duper HD! Please combine all your clips together if possible.

Ultimately, what you are after is one decent interpretation of the role from start to finish in one unbroken take. Just one – not lots of different versions, and not cut together from a variety of takes[Puro Casting]

  • Please trim anything non relevant, such as you moving around at the beginning/end to operate the camera.
  • Do not include any personal contact details or reference to other agents. Just your name and TV Twins, and (if relevant) our email address (info@tvtwins.uk).
  • Use ‘medium’ settings to save the file and label with the character you are playing and your name. Please title appropriately, e.g. “character-your_name”, or as specified in the brief.
  • Upload directly from your smartphone to Vimeo (with the ability to download enabled), or use a service like DropboxWe TransferYou Send It or Mail Big File to send exported files to media@tvtwins.uk

Don’t use showreel material in place of a self-tape, but they are a useful addition. Your showreels should only consist of clips from your films and TV productions. Do not use personally manufactured scenes[Ros Hubbard]

Now practice by recording an intro to yourselves…

Tape an Intro Video

Camera/phone should NOT be hand held. Please rest it on a steady surface and film in landscape mode.

Categories: Castings, Registration

Please note that TV Twins is committed to equal opportunities for all performers, irrespective of colour, race, religion or belief, ethnic or national origins, gender, marital/civil partnership status, disability or age, religion, sexual orientation, or any other criteria not related to skills or abilities.

Where gender, age, height and or/appearance has been specified on a post, the casting director has confirmed that such characteristics are a genuine occupational requirement of the role.

Category: Castings

Season 6 filming is almost complete for twin/triplet ‘face-off’ models for Glow Up!

We’re currently on our 6th series which filmed in Jan/Feb 2024. At the end of each episode two contestants compete to stay on the show by both attempting a make-up look, which is done on a pair of identical twins. If you haven’t seen it or modelled for it before, check out Glow Up: Britain’s Next Make-Up Star on iPlayer.

They need different models depending on the task the MUAs have to undertake in the face-off contest, so models may be needed for lips, eyebrows, etc. and we don’t know the dates for specifics yet, so flexibility is key!

Rate – London Twin/Triplet Models

  • £250 each for a 10hr filming day; including agency fees.
  • Travel – Wall to Wall to cover anything over £10 for patch testing and filming days; standard train tickets & off peak where possible.
  • Some models may be asked to come in for patch testing the day before, this will be either at Spring Studios or a central London location.

Rate – Outside of London or a reasonable journey agreed with Wall to Wall and TV Twins

  • £250 each for a 10hr filming day; including agency fees.
  • Travel – Wall to Wall to cover anything over £10 for patch testing and filming days; standard train tickets & off peak where possible.
  • Overnights – Wall to Wall will provide overnights when a patch test is needed the day before for the filming day

Paperwork

  • All models across the series will need to provide a copy of their passport and
  • Sign a ‘Model release form’ on arrival at the location.

If you are booked to be a Face Off Model, your call time would typically be from around 11.30 am, although this can vary. The day rate for each model will be £250. A member of our production team will book your travel to and from our studio and we will provide you with your meals, snacks and drinks for the duration.

When you arrive, you will have base make-up and hair done by one of our professional, production make-up artists. You’ll be required to be fully dressed in black wearing a vest, trousers, and shoes. Models must arrive wearing no make-up, all piercings removed, with clean hair and they must be clean shaven. 

When booked, you may NOT post anything on social media about Glow Up!

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO…

  1. Let us know any dates you’re NOT available!
  2. Ensure passports are uploaded to your profile – take a photo of the full photo pages as pictured, and name them: “Full Name (passport)“.
  3. Ensure your FULL address is listed on your profile so the team can arrange taxis.
  4. Update your profile with up to date close-up headshots taken from different angles with no make-up or filters and in natural light.
  5. Send a very short video of yourselves with no makeup on, piercings out, facing front, slowly turning your faces left and right, in good lighting. You can do this together or separately – whatever’s easiest, and you can Whatsapp them if easier 07752440376

TV Twins Glow Up Team

Tag: castings
Categories: Castings, Self-taping

If you’ve been asked to self-tape, we want to ensure you have all the information you need. If you’re taping as identical twins, you need to look alike!

Read FAQs prior to starting each audition!

  1. Tapes should be in landscape mode, with camera/phone resting on a steady surface – never handheld – framing head and shoulders at eye level – we need to see your eyes and face – in a well lit room (light in-front not behind you!). We want to see you clearly.
  2. Do not SHOUT and do not rush – friendly and confidently (see taping lines below). Listen back to your tape and if muffled or sound not clear, redo tape with mic closer!
  3. Always start with a short ident and send one headshot/selfie taken at time of taping.
  4. Read the instructions from the Casting Director thoroughly and check the deadline – try to submit media in good time so agent can preview and ask you to redo if needed.
  5. Do not include anything not requested and trim tapes to shortest possible timings.
  6. If relevant, state that you’re available for all dates (highlight non-availability), and whether you have any commercial conflicts.

If you’re asked to tape lines:

  • We know sometimes scripts appear huge, but it’s best to memorize any lines and be off-book when auditioning.
  • We don’t want to hear anyone else reading your lines, but someone else can read other lines off-camera, but close enough so we can hear them.
  • Lines could be propped up next to the camera so we still see your eyes and face while speaking them. But after repeating lines a few times, you’re sure to pick them up and be off-book!

If you’re asked to complete any forms:

If asked to complete forms, do not provide ANY personal contact details for yourself! Instead, use the following:

Uploading media:

All FILES must be renamed: “Full Name(s) – ROLE – TV Twins” else risk not being submitted – see How to rename files or Search.

We cannot accept HEVC/HEIF files (change camera settings to ‘most compatible’). Max size 500mb.

Upload everything requested to TV Twins links below – not direct to the Casting Director (unless specifically requested otherwise by us) as we need to check everything over first!

Please let us know when you have completed uploading your audition files!

Categories: Castings, Registration

Members must choose to receive castings calls. If you don’t want Instant posts, choose Digest. Here are the options:

  • Under 6s – castings for all twins and singletons aged 0-5 years
  • Under 16s – castings for all twins and singletons aged 6-15 years
  • Over 16s – castings for all twins and singletons aged 16+ years
  • Families – castings requiring real family connections of all ages
  • Digest – Twice weekly emails with all the latest castings

Public subscribers can choose to receive weekly Digest posts.

Filter Emails

We do send quite a lot of emails so advice you to set up a filter in your email client.

Why?

  1. So they don’t clutter up your inbox
  2. So you don’t miss something important

How?

  1. Create rules to filter your emails – Gmail
  2. Filter emails in Mail on iPhone
  3. How to organize Outlook email using folders and rules
  4. How To Filter Emails In Hotmail To Clean Up Your Inbox

Your email client not listed? Google it, or reply and we’ll see what we can find for you 🙂

Children (2)

Category: Children

A chaperone is a person, licensed under a local authority, who accompanies and looks after another person or group of people.

All children under 16 need to be chaperoned by law. If the child will not be with their parent, school teacher or home tutor, they must be supervised by a chaperone approved by the council.

Sometimes parents can act as chaperone to their own children – this does not mean they’re licenced.

If you would like to register for a chaperone licence, follow this link:

Become a licensed chaperone for child performers

Category: Children

A child performance licence is required for all working children in the entertainment industry. The law applies to all children and young people from birth until the completion of compulsory school in which a child reaches the age of 16.

  • England – this is the last Friday in June of the school year when the child reaches the age of 16 and finishes Year 11 at school.
  • Scotland – if the child turns 16 between 1st March and 30th September they can leave school after 31st May of that year, and if they turn 16 between 1st October and the end of February they can leave at the start of the Christmas holidays in that school year.
  • Wales – they can leave school on the last Friday in June, as long as they’ll be 16 by the end of that school year’s summer holidays.
  • Northern Ireland – if you turn 16 during the school year (between 1 September and 1 July) you can leave school after 30 June.

If the job is overseas then an overseas licence is still required up to the age of 18.

The person in charge of the event (the ‘applicant’) applies to the child’s local council for the licence. So the Production Company hiring your child, or TV Twins will undertake the application procedure, not the parents!

The process can be time consuming and ideally should be applied for 21-days ahead of the event. However, since there’s often a very short turnaround period for shoots it might help if you knew where to download the relevant docs and what to prepare in advance!

Parents must supply the following for each licence application per child:

  1. Two recent passport-sized photographs of the child;
  2. Proof of the child’s date of birth (copy of birth certificate or back page of valid passport);
  3. Letter from the child’s headteacher agreeing to their absence from school and/or confirming that the proposed performances will not be detrimental to the child’s education;
  4. Health declaration form (if shooting abroad);
  5. Part 2 of the licence application form.

The Production Company (applicant) should supply:

  1. Confirmation email to include:
    1. fees
    2. what’s expected of child
    3. Itinerary: full location address(es) of shoot/rehearsals, with times and dates
  2. Part 1 of the licence application form;
  3. Safeguarding policy and risk assessment.

Find your local authority by entering your postcode at this link: Apply for a child performance licence

Use CamScanner to send us copies of birth certificate and passport photos. Upload files to our Dropbox, but ensure they’re named appropriately so we know who is who!!

WHEN ASKED, DOWNLOAD DOCUMENTS HERE:

Don’t forget that for twins you need 2 copies of everything; they cannot share a form 🙂

School permission letter (parents should ask Headteacher to sign) – PDF

CHILD-PERFORMANCE-LICENCE Download

Part 1 (agency/client to complete) – PDF

Child License – Part 1 (For agency or client) Download

Part 2 (parents to complete) – PDF

Child License – Part 2 (For parent) Download

Best to download Part 1 and 2 direct from your LA website as they like their own forms to be used! Or wait for us to send it to you.

Become a licensed chaperone for child performers

Tags: child, licence

Fees (2)

Categories: Fees, Registration

Nothing! It is free to join TV Twins and use our services. We only take commission on jobs we secure. See our Terms and Conditions for commission rates.

Artists are required to cover their own expenses such as Spotlight entry, Actors Equity subscriptions, headshots and show/audio reels, travel to auditions when expenses are not covered by production.

Tags: fees, registering
Category: Fees

Please find attached the latest Equity Supporting Artist Rate Card which stipulates all the minimum rates across BBC, ITV, TAC, as well as the updated minimum rates for PACT TV, SVoD Originals & feature film. This document will also be available on the Equity website.

Also attached is the BBC Rate Card for Supporting Artists, Walk-Ons, Featured and Child Artists: Rates from 1st April 2019

Tag: fees

Glossary (4)

Category: Glossary

Identical twins are also known as monozygotic twins, and result from the fertilization of a single egg that splits in two. Identical twins share all of their genes and are always of the same sex.

In contrast, fraternal, or dizygotic, twins result from the fertilization of two separate eggs during the same pregnancy. They share half of their genes, just like any other siblings. Fraternal twins can be of the same or different sexes.

Singleton is the birth of only one child during a single delivery.

Triplets can be either fraternal, identical, or a combination of both. The most common are strictly fraternal triplets, which come from a polyzygotic pregnancy of three eggs. Less common are triplets from a dizygotic pregnancy, where one zygote divides into two identical fetuses, and the other doesn’t.


There are more different kinds of twins – see below. Normally, except the first two kinds, others are known to be quite rare to occur. All these twins, apart from similar faces have some varied characteristics.

MIRROR IMAGE TWINS

These twins will often have “mirror images” of their features, such as hair whorls that run clockwise in one and counter clockwise in the other, a birthmark on the right shoulder of one and the left shoulder of the other, etc. There is no specific test for determining if twins are mirror-image. The determination is made by observation only.

HALF-IDENTICAL TWINS

These are the type of twins who share half their genes in common (from the mother) and the other half different (from the two sperms). They share some features of identical twins and some features of fraternal twins and thus are called half-identical twins.

MIXED CHROMOSOME TWINS

This occurs if two separate sperms fertilize two separate eggs which then fuse, producing individuals with different sets of chromosomes. Some have been identified to have more than one distinct red blood cell type and individuals who are both XX and XY (the sex chromosomes – XX being female and XY being male.) It is very rare, and less than 25 cases have been identified as yet.

SUPERFETATION

Superfetation is the occurrence of another pregnancy during an ongoing pregnancy. It happens when there is fertilization of an ovule by a sperm cell while a conceptus is already present in the womb.

SUPERFECUNDATION

Twins can have different fathers. One well known case was described in 1810 in the United States. A woman had both a white and a black lover, and she became pregnant and gave birth to twins, one white and the other black. Each twin had a different father. This is called superfecundation.

FRATERNAL TWINS

Twins that are male and female or have different blood types can easily be determined as fraternal. Fraternal twins can share many similarities in appearance just like any brother or sister of the same family.

IDENTICAL TWINS

Identical twins start out as genetically identical as they have the same genes. They are formed by a fertilized egg dividing into two separate individuals. They are always of the same sex.

MONOCHORIONIC TWINS

  • Monochorionic twins are identical twins who share one placenta. This occurs in approximately 70 percent of pregnancies with identical twins. 
  • Monochorionic-monoamniotic twins are identical twins who share both a placenta and an amniotic sac. 
  • Monochorionic-diamniotic twins are identical twins who share a placenta but not an amniotic sac. 
  • Dichorionic twins each have their own placenta and amniotic sac. This occurs in approximately 30 percent of pregnancies of identical twins. All fraternal (non-identical) twins also are dichorionic twins.
Tags: glossary, profile
Category: Glossary

Acting Dictionary – All Acting Terms

For actors in the business, knowing all the acting terms will prove to be useful, as the acting industry runs on them. When you’re knowledgeable in this area, it shows your professionalism. Therefore, on behalf of our Acting for Beginners Guide, we’re very happy to bring you the biggest online Acting Dictionary / Actors’ Vocabulary with a huge amount of acting terms to help you catch up on acting terminology.

A

ACT: One of the main sections of a Screenplay or a play

ACTING PROCESS: Specific choices an actor makes to bring the character to life

ACTION: One of the key words a Director says to start the scene

AD LIB: Dialogue in the scene that has been improvised

ADJUSTMENT: An artist’s pay is being increased above the base rate

ADR (screen): Automated Dialogue Replacement – dialogue that has been added in post-production

ADVANCE: Money that has been paid in advance to secure somebody’s work

AGENT: An artist’s/performers representation in the business responsible for negotiations and other business deals

AISLE (stage): A walkway that goes through two different seat areas

ART DIRECTOR (screen): A person responsible for designing a film set

ASIDE (stage): A line delivered to audience that isn’t meant to be heard by other performers on the stage

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR (screen): Director’s assistant, often referred to as A.D.

ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER (stage): Stage Manager’s assistant

AUDITION: An artist’s tryout for a role/job where demonstration of skills is required

B

BACK TO ONE: A direction for performers to return to their starting reading/scene positions

BACKGROUND (screen): People who work in the background of the scene, often referred to as Extras

BACKSTAGE (stage): Part of the theatre not being seen by the audience, like dressing rooms

BEAT: A pause of varying length in the scene, usually to emphasize an emotion or a thought

BEAUTY SHOT (screen): The last shot on a TV show, which is then used to run the credits

BELT (stage): A style of loud and full tone singing in Musical Theatre productions

BEST BOY (screen): Assistant to a Gaffer

BILLING (screen): The list of names in the Opening Credits

BIO: Short for “Biography”, a short description of performers or other people working on a production

BLACK BOX (stage): When theatre room is surrounded in black curtains and audience are in the same room with performers

BLACK OUT (stage): An immediate shutdown of all stage lights

BLOCKING: A rehearsal of physical actions taken by actors during a scene, including entrances and exits

BLUE SCREEN (screen): Filming with a large blue screen in the background so that special effects could be added in post-production

BOOK (stage): A script for a play, musical’s libretto

BOOKING: Employing an actor and scheduling them for a role

BOOM (screen): A set-microphone at the end of a long pole to use over performers’ heads so as to keep it out of the shot

BOX OFFICE: Commercial success of any production/performer based on profits and audience’s size

BOX OFFICE (stage): A place where tickets to a production are being sold

BOX OFFICE MANAGER (stage): A person in charge of ticketing and reservations

BREAK A LEG: A term used among actors before performance or audition which means “Good Luck”

BREAKDOWN: Production’s description by Casting Directors privately passed on to Talent Agents to find performers to attach to the project

BREAKING CHARACTER: Stepping outside of the imaginary world of performance

BROADWAY: Most famous theatrical district in the world based in New York City

BUMP: A one time payment for additional services

BUY OUT: A flat fee for a production that will not return any Residuals

C

CALL SHEET (screen): A list of Cast and Crew with the day’s filming schedule

CALL TIME: The time by which someone has to be on the set or stage; start of the day of shooting

CALLBACK (or RECALL): A second round of Auditions for the same role the performer initially went for

CAMERA CREW (screen): A team in charge of everything to do with the camera

CAMERA LEFT/RIGHT (screen): Indicates the side of the shot where the performers are kept, from the Camera Operator’s perspective

CAMERA OPERATOR (screen): The person responsible for operation of the camera and looking through the lens during a Take

CAMERA READY (screen): Description of anyone who is completely ready to appear on camera, dressed for the part and in make-up

CAP: Performer completing their section of the scene

CAST: All actors and performers in a production

CASTING: The process of actors being chosen (cast) for the role, done by the Casting Director and/or Director, Producer

CASTING DIRECTOR: The person responsible for Casting, in speech often referred to as C.D.

CASTING NOTICE: Similar to Breakdown, except this one is available to the public and is often listed on casting websites

CATERER: The person responsible for all the food on the set or stage

CATTLE CALL: Auditions that are open to all types of actors: professionals, amateurs, Union members and non-Union

CATWALK (stage): A very narrow walkway on the ceiling of a theatre where lights and scenery are hung from

CHANGES: Different performers’ outfits worn during a production

CHARACTER: The person who is going to be played by an actor during a production

CHEAT (screen): An angle where an actor is being positioned to better accommodate the camera

CHECKING THE GATE (screen): Checking the lens of a camera

CHIEF ELECTRICIAN: A person in charge of an electrical team, sometimes referred to as Gaffer

CHOREOGRAPHER: A person responsible for arranging movements and creating dances for actors to perform

CHORUS: A company of singers and dancers, OR songs and dances performed by those people

CINEMATOGRAPHER (screen): Someone in charge of the Camera Crew, often referred to as Director of Photography (D.P.)

CLOSE-UP (screen): A close shot of an actor, from forehead to the chin, often marked as C.U. in the Screenplay

CLOSING OFF (stage): An actor’s action of turning away from the audience; opposite of Opening Up

COLD READING: During an Audition, reading of the Sides that are completely new to the actor

COLOR COVER (screen): A Stand-In wearing the same color as the principal actor

COMMISSION: A percentage taken from an actor’s paycheck by a Talent Agent or a Manager

COMPANY (stage): The whole Cast and Crew of a stage production

COMPOSITE: 3-5 different photographs of an actor to show off their various looks, sometimes referred to as Comp Card

CONTROL BOOTH (stage): A small room/place in the theatre from where all technical things, lights and sound, are controlled

COPY (screen): A Script for a production that’s for TV, usually a radio Voice Over or a Commercial

COSTUMER: The person responsible for costumes

COVER SHOT (screen): An additional shot that might be of a different angle to a Master Shot done for editing purposes

CRAFT SERVICES: A table with food and snacks, cared for by Caterer

CRANE SHOT (screen): A shot of a scene from above, often with the camera hanging on a crane

CRAWL (screen): The ending Credits

CREDITS (screen): Appearance of names involved in the production, OR list of actor’s experience on their Resume

CREW: All people involved in the production except for the actors

CUE: A signal for an actor to act/begin

CURTAIN (stage): A screen of cloth  on stage that separates the audience from the performers

CURTAIN CALL (stage): The time at the end of a stage performance when all actors come out to take their bows

CUT (screen): A cue to cease the action of the scene, usually given by the Director

CUTAWAY (screen): A short scene showing something other than the person in the previous shot (e.g. what they’re reading)

D

DAILIES (screen): A raw footage that has been shot that day and is yet to be edited

DAY PERFORMER: The person hired to work on a production on a day-to-day basis, not on a contract

DEMO REEL/SHOWREEL: A short footage that showcases performers’ skills

DIALECT: A regional accent that is often adopted by actors to make the role more believable

DIALOGUE: A verbal exchange among at least two actors

DIRECTOR: The person responsible for all components of the production

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY (screen): The person responsible for Camera Crew and filming process, makes decisions with the Director

DOLLY (screen): A piece of equipment used on the camera to allow for more mobility

DOLLY GRIP (screen): The person from the Crew responsible for working with Dolly

DOUBLE: A person who is used in a place of a principal actor; not to be confused with Stand-In

DOWNSCALE: Performers who appear in casual and regular clothing

DOWNSTAGE (stage): Part of the stage that is closest to the audience

DRAMATIST: The person who writes plays, also known as Playwright

DRESS REHEARSAL (stage): A principal rehearsal just before the show with the Cast in full costumes

DRESSERS (stage): People responsible for helping performers to get in and out of their costumes during the show

DRESSING (screen): Various items and props used on the set to make the scene look more realistic

DRESSING ROOMS (stage): Rooms in the theatre where actors change into costumes

DROP (stage): Fabric that is hung on the stage and often used in the actual show

DROPPING CUES: Actors forgetting their lines or missing the Cue

E

EIGHTEEN TO PLAY YOUNGER (screen): Someone who is 18 years or older, but can played a younger role

ELECTRICIAN: The person usually responsible for all of the lighting part

ENSEMBLE: A group of performers in the production

EQUITY: Trade Union to protect all kinds of performers in the business by regulating pay and working conditions

ESTABLISHED (screen): When a person or object has been established in the shot in a specific position or doing a specific action

ETHNIC TYPES: Referring to the race of a person which is most often not Caucasian

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: The person responsible for the business side of the production, including funding

EXIT (stage): A stage direction for an actor to leave the stage

EXT. (screen): Short for “Exterior”, used in a Screenplay to indicate a scene outside

EXTRA (screen): A non-speaking role in the production that is used in the background to create an atmosphere of the scene

F

FEATURE (screen): A film that is of full length

FEATURED (stage): Second to Lead role in a stage production, similar to Supporting in films

FIELD REPRESENTATIVE: A representative of the Union that is responsible for making sure that standards are upheld

FIRST A.D. (screen): Short for “First Assistant Director”, the person responsible for giving most of the directions on the set to the Cast and Crew

FIRST TEAM: Principal actors

FORCED CALL: When the Cast and Crew have to work in less than 12 hours after they have finished

FOREGROUND CROSS (screen): When an Extra crosses in front of the camera or principal actors

FOURTH WALL (stage): An imaginary wall between the audience and actors on the stage during a show

FRONT OF HOUSE (stage): Area of theatre and people who deal with the audience, like Ushers, Box Office, etc.

FX / SOUND FX (screen): Special effects

G

GAFFER: Head Electrician, also known as Chief Electrician

GOLDEN TIME (screen): 16th hour on the shooting day; Extras receive Base Pay for every single hour spent on set past this point

GREEN ROOM (stage): A room where performers relax before going on stage

GREEN SCREEN (screen): Same as Blue Screen, except the screen is of green color; the choice of Green Screen is more common than Blue

GRIPS (screen): Crew that is responsible for moving the equipment around the set

H

HAND PROPS (stage): Objects held by performers used to tell a story

HEADSHOT: A photograph a performer to showcase their look

HOLDING (screen): A room/area where Extras are staying while not working on the set

HOLDING BOOK: When a member of the crew assists performers by giving them their lines

HONEYWAGON (screen): Truck trailer close to the set that hosts bathrooms and changing rooms

HOT SET (screen): A set that is ready for filming

HOUSE (stage): Means audience in the theatre, OR could be short for Front of House

HOUSE LIGHTS (stage): Lights that are used to light the auditorium

HOUSE MANAGER (stage): The person responsible for anything to do with the audience

HOUSE OPEN (stage): When the audience are being seated before the show and performers can no longer appear on the stage

I

IMPROVISATION: Coming up with actions and/or lines on the spot without any preparation

INDUSTRIAL (screen): Film, Short or a video clip used for educational purposes only

INSERTS (screen): A shot that is used in the footage during post-production

INT. (screen): Short for “Interior”, a term used in Screenplay to indicate a scene taking place inside

L

LIBRETTO (stage): A book or script of a musical or opera production

LIGHTING DESIGNER (stage): The person responsible for show’s lighting

LINE PRODUCER: The person responsible for keeping the Director on the budget and on the schedule

LOCATION (screen): It could refer to the stage, set or an area where the filming is taking place

LONG SHOT (screen): A shot that exposes most or all of actor’s body, often abbreviated as L.S.

LOOPING (screen): Tool used in post-production to correct dialogue that has already been shot, OR use of audio/music on the loop

M

MARK (screen): A designated position where an actor has to stand in order to be at a perfect angle/lighting for the shot

MARKER (screen): A command used along with a Slate Board to indicate a visual cue for the camera

MARKING OUT (stage): The process of marking out the stage to indicate where the props and furniture is going to stand

MASTER SHOT (screen): An important shot that comprises principal actor(s) and background to create a scene

MATCHING ACTIONS (screen): When an actor has to match their previous actions for another shot after they have been Established

MATINEE (stage): A performance of the show that takes place in the afternoon

MEAL PENALTY (screen): A payment to actors and Extras if the production doesn’t break for meals at least every six hours

MIXER (screen): The person in charge of the Sound Crew, responsible for the quality of the sound

MONOLOGUE: An longer speech used by a single actor without breaks for Dialogue, often used for Auditions

M.O.S / S.O.C (screen): Short for “Motion Only Shot” and “Silent on Camera”, where the shot is taken without any sound or Dialogue

MUSICAL DIRECTOR (stage): The person responsible for musical effects of the show, usually works with the Director and orchestra

N

NIGHT PREMIUM: An additional pay for people working past 8 PM.

O

OFF BOOK: The term that refers for when actors must have all their lines memorized, not reading them off book or off script

OFF-BROADWAY: New York City theatres that aren’t located on Broadway

OFF-CAMERA (screen): A Dialogue or Monologue performed by an actor who isn’t in shot, often abbreviated as O.C.

OFFSTAGE (stage): Stage’s area that the audience cannot see

ON BOOK: The term that refers for when actors are still using their scripts in rehearsals; opposite to Off Book

OPEN CALL: Same as Cattle Call; long days of general Auditions available for anybody

OPENING CREDITS (screen): Credits shown in the beginning of a film or a TV show

OPENING UP (stage): An actor’s action of turning away from the audience; opposite of Closing Off

ORCHESTRA PIT (stage): A sunken area of the theatre in Front of House where the conductor and musicians are located

OUT OF FRAME (screen): A term that refers to a performer who’s outside of camera’s field of vision

OVER THE SHOULDER (screen): A shot that is focused on one actor while being filmed over the shoulder of an actor opposite them

OVERDUBBING (screen): Technique of using one audio track/sound on top of another

OVERTIME: The term refers to the time after 8 hours of work

OVERTURE (stage): The introductory music during a musical show to give the audience a feeling of what’s to come

P

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT (screen): The person responsible for a big variety of things during a film production, often abbreviated as P.A.

PAN (screen): A sweeping camera shot/movement that goes from one end to the other without any cuts

PANTOMIME: A pretend speech when Extras in the background are imitating real conversations; same as Ad Lib

PER DIEM: A fee paid to the actor to cover meal costs that weren’t initially cover by the Producer

PERSONAL PROPS (stage): Props that actors carry with them in their costumes

PICK UP: Starting from a designated place in the scene that isn’t the very beginning

PICKING UP CUES: A term that refers to performers acting on their Cues faster than they previously have

PICTURE’S UP (screen): This line is shouted when a cue to shoot a scene is coming

PILOT (screen): A first episode of the TV show that is produced in order to sell the whole show

PLACES (stage): A command from Stage Manager which means all actors have to take their designated positions before going on stage

PLAYBILL (stage): A pamphlet, booklet or program that contains information about the show, OR a poster of the show

PLAYWRIGHT (stage): A person who writes plays and dramatic literature, also known as Dramatist

POST-PRODUCTION (screen): The stage that the production enters to start the editing process after all the filming has wrapped up

P.O.V SHOT (screen): Short for “Point of View Shot”, where the shot is positioned in the way to indicate Character’s perspective

PRE-PRODUCTION (screen): The stage that the production is in before all the filming begins (writing, casting, location scouting, etc.)

PRESET (stage): When a prop or costume is placed on the stage before the show begins

PRINCIPAL: Actors with speaking parts

PRODUCER: The person responsible for the business side, as well as financing and supervising the production

PRODUCTION COMPANY: The firm that is making the production happen

PROFILE: Performers’ view from the side

PROMPT (stage): A person who follows the play by the book and gives actors the line when they forget; similar to Holding Book

PROP MISTRESS / MASTER (stage): Someone who’s in charge of all the Props

PROPS: Objects and items used by performers on the set and stage; not the same as costumes

PROSCENIUM (stage): Arch that frames front of a theatre stage

R

READING (stage): Reading and demonstration of a new play to an audience with little to no actions

READ-THROUGH (stage): A first reading of the play by the cast that is going to perform on the show

REAR OF HOUSE (stage): Area in the back of the stage, usually used to store props and furniture

RECALL (or CALLBACK): A second round of Auditions for the same role the performer initially went for

REHEARSAL: Time of practice and Blocking before the actual performance either on stage or in front of the camera

REPERTORY THEATRE (stage): A theatre group that rehearses several plays at a time

REPRISE: Repeating the performance

RESIDUAL (screen): A pay that performers get every time the production they were a part of gets rebroadcast

RESUME: A list of actor’s information, including Credits, personal details, special skills, etc.

REWRITE: Editing of the Screenplay or a play

RISER (stage): A platform on the stage that creates different levels

ROLL OVER (screen): A command given by the Director to Cinematographer and Mixer to start rolling

ROLLING! (screen): A command then given by the member of the Crew to start rolling the cameras and sound

ROOM TONE (screen): Recording of a sound on location, sometimes referred to as Wild Track

RUN (stage): The number of times that the stage show has been performed

RUNNING-TIME (stage): The time it takes to run through the stage show, including intermissions

RUN-THROUGH (stage): Rehearsal where the whole show is being run from the beginning to the end

RUSH CALL (screen): Last minute booking of performers or Extras

S

SCENARIO: An outline of the plot

SCREENPLAY (screen): A written piece of material by a Screenwriter used for a film or TV, also known as Script

SCREENWRITER (screen): The person responsible for writing a Screenplay to film

SCRIM (stage): A drop of special material used to for setting the scene

SCRIPT (screen): A written piece of material for film or TV, sames as Screenplay

SCRIPT SUPERVISOR (screen): The person responsible for tracking all the changes made to the Script

SECOND ASSISTANT DIRECTOR (screen): The person responsible for dealing with things that have to do with actors and Script revisions

SECOND TEAM (screen): The Crew that’s ready for Stand-Ins coming in

SECOND UNIT (screen): A small group of filmmakers that film less important shots not involving principal actors

SEGUE (screen): A transition from one shot to the other

SELECTIONS (screen): Wardrobe of actors or Extras

SET: Either location where the filming takes place or a stage where a theatrical production is being staged

SET DESIGNER (stage): The person responsible for stage’s set design

SET-UP (screen): The time of camera changing the position

SHORT (screen): Refers to Short Film, which is a film of shorter length, usually made on a lower budget by aspiring filmmakers

SIDES: Part of the script, usually a couple of pages, that is used during an Audition

SKINS: List of people working who have been booked for that particular day

SLATE (screen): A quick statement to the camera of performer’s name, and any additional required details before the Audition begins

SLATE BOARD (screen): A chalkboard with a clapper on top used as a visual Cue for the camera and to mark the shot being filmed

SOLILOQUY: Monologue that usually represents the inner workings of one character’s perspective

SOUND DESIGNER (stage): The person responsible for designing sound directions during a staged show

SOUND EFFECTS (stage): Noises used to accompany a scene on stage

SPEC (screen): People who arrived on the set when they’re not booked, OR a Screenplay that has been written without arrangement

SPEED (screen): A old-fashioned command from a Crew member to indicate that everything is ready for filming the scene

SPIKE (stage): The same thing as Marking Out

SPIKING THE LENS (screen): The term that refers to an actor looking directly into the camera during a Take

SQUIB: A small device that simulates a bullet-shot on the body and similar effects

STAGE DIRECTIONS (stage): Script giving actors specific directions for actions on the stage

STAGE FRIGHT: An anxiety during the performance

STAGE LEFT (stage): A Stage Direction for the actor to move to the left, from actor’s perspective

STAGE MANAGER (stage): The person responsible for running the whole show

STAGE RIGHT (stage): A Stage Direction for the actor to move to the right, from actor’s perspective

STAGE WHISPER (stage): Whisper during a show that isn’t supposed to be heard by the audience

STANDBY: The command for actors to be ready for their Cue for action

STAND-INS (screen): Performers used in the place of principal actors while adjusting cameras and lights

STEPPING ON LINES: A term used for when one actor cuts off another actor, not to be confused with interruption

STRIKE (stage): Taking apart the stage set

STUDIO (screen): A room or a building where the filming on the Set takes place

STUNT COORDINATOR: The person who’s responsible for coordinating all Stunts performed by actors

STUNT DOUBLE: The person who performs all the Stunts instead of the principal actor

STUNT: Physical actions that are considered dangerous

SUBMISSIONSubmission/suggestion of actors for roles

SUBTEXT: The true feeling behind the words that a character is saying

SUMMER STOCK (stage): Repertory Theatre that produces shows during summer time

SW (screen): Implication of an actor commencing work on that particular day; term used on the Call Sheet

SWF (screen): Implication of an actor beginning and finishing their work on that particular day; term used on the Call Sheet

SWING (stage): A performer in a musical show who substitutes for chorus that cannot perform; similar to Understudy

T

TAKE (screen): A shot that is being taken

TAKE 5: Five minute break

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR (stage): The person responsible for supervising construction of a stage set

TECHNICAL REHEARSAL (stage): The first time the play is rehearsed at the location it’s going to be seen by an audience

TELEPROMPTER: A device that allows for the reader to look right into the camera while reading the Script

THREE BELLS (screen): An indication to be quite on the set during the filming of the scene

TIGHT SHOT (screen): A shot that focuses on a single subject and allows for very little to no extra space around

TILT (screen): When movement of the camera vertically

TIMING: Best moment for an actor to do something or say something

TOPPING A LINE: A term refers to an actor responding with a line that is more powerful than the one delivered before them

TRACKING SHOT (screen): A shot taken with a camera on the move

TRADES: The type of media that is about the entertainment media, also known as Trade Papers

TRAP (stage): An opening on the stage where something or someone can be hidden

TREATMENT: More detailed explanation of the story or plot

TROUPE (stage): A theatre company formed by a group of actors

TURNAROUND (screen): Shot from a different direction, OR the time between finishing work and starting it the next day

TWO-SHOT (screen): A shot of two actors

U

UNDERSTUDY: An actor who learns one or more roles to substitute in case principal actors cannot perform

UNION: Unions are responsible for protecting performers’ rights, regulating pay and working hours

UPGRADE (screen): Usually refers to individuals being promoted to being a more significant part of the production

UNIT PRODUCTION MANAGER (screen): The person responsible for managing production’s costs, often abbreviated as UPM

UPSCALE (screen): The term refers to performers and Extras that come in nicely dressed; opposite of Downscale

UPSTAGE (stage): Area of the stage farthest away from the auditorium

V

V.O. (screen): Abbreviation for “Voice Over”

VOICE OVER (screen): A term used to indicate an off-camera directions, narration, commentary, etc.

W

W (screen): Implication of an actor working on that particular day; term used on Call Sheet

W/N (screen): Implication that an actor will be working on that particular day, but no time has been decided yet; used on Call Sheet

WAIVERS: A Union’s approvement to deviate from the contract

WALKAWAY: Break for meals when the Cast and Crew can go on their own to eat

WARDROBE: An actor’s clothing for the performance or filming

WARDROBE ALLOWANCE (screen): Payment made to actors who use their own Wardrobe during the filming

WARDROBE FITTING: An appointment when actors are trying out Wardrobe and costumes

WEATHER PERMIT CALL (screen): During unplanned weather conditions, the production can dismiss actors 4 hours after the Call Time

WRANGLER (stage): The person responsible for the younger cast members

WRAP (screen): The end of the filming for the day or the whole production

WRAP PARTY: Party that takes place after the production has been finished and Wrapped

All acting terms in the Acting Dictionary / Actors’ Vocabulary are being constantly updated and new terminologies are being added all the time.

[Source: https://actinginlondon.co.uk/acting-dictionary/]
Tag: glossary
Category: Glossary

An allergy occurs when your body’s immune system sees a certain substance as harmful. It reacts by causing an allergic reaction. Substances that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

There are many types of allergies. Some allergies are seasonal and others are year-round. Some allergies may be life-long.

It is important to work with your health care provider to create a plan to manage your allergy. Avoiding your allergens is the best way to prevent an allergic reaction.

DRUG ALLERGY

True allergies to drugs (medicines) occur in only a small number of people. Most drug reactions are not allergic, but are side effects of the properties of the medicine. A diagnosis of the cause of the drug reaction is usually based only upon the patient’s history and symptoms. Sometimes skin testing for drug allergy is also done.

FOOD ALLERGY

There are different types of allergic reactions to foods. There are differences between IgE-mediated allergies, non-IgE mediated allergies and food intolerances.

INSECT ALLERGY

Bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets and fire ants are the most common stinging insects that cause an allergic reaction.

Non-stinging insects can also cause allergic reactions. The most common are cockroaches and the insect-like dust mite. Allergies to these two insects may be the most common cause of year-round allergy and asthma.

LATEX ALLERGY

A latex allergy is an allergic reaction to natural rubber latex. Natural rubber latex gloves, balloons, condoms and other natural rubber products contain latex. An allergy to latex can be a serious health risk.

MOLD ALLERGY

Mold and mildew are fungi. Since fungi grow in so many places, both indoors and outdoors, allergic reactions can occur year round.

PET ALLERGY

Allergies to pets with fur are common. It is important to know that an allergy-free (hypoallergenic) breed of dog or cat does not exist.

POLLEN ALLERGY

Pollen is one of the most common triggers of seasonal allergies. Many people know pollen allergy as “hay fever,” but experts usually refer to it as “seasonal allergic rhinitis.”

Tags: glossary, profile
Category: Glossary

We’re getting lots of briefs requesting talent eat certain types of food, so we’ve now added a ‘Diet’ section to your profile – please complete ‘Diet’ under ‘Features’ tab.

Here are the most common types of eaters.

OMNIVORES

An omnivore is a person who eats all types of food.  The word omnivore literally translates to “all devour.” 

These eaters do not discriminate against any individual food group and will eat pretty much anything that is served to them.

Most people consider themselves to be omnivores and say they eat pretty much everything. The reality is, humans tend to be creatures of habit and often rotate through the same foods. Many lean towards certain types of meats or have some sort of dietary restriction (i.e. food allergy, medical/religious restriction, or personal preference). If you’re one of those people, you may better identify with one of the eaters below…

CARNIVORES

A carnivore (a.k.a. meatatarian or meat-eater) is a person who predominantly eats red meat, which includes: pork, beef, veal and lamb. The word carnivore literally translates to “meat devourer.”

Those who follow the popular Paleo diet often consider themselves carnivores since they regularly eat various forms of red meat (along with fish, fruits, nuts and seeds).

If you find yourself always eating traditional burgers, steaks, meatballs and other red meats, it may be more accurate to call yourself a carnivore than an omnivore.

While this pandemic may hinder you from going out to feed your meat cravings,  you can easily order online by checking some of the most recommended meat deliveries today.

POLLOTARIANS

A pollotarian is a person who primarily eats poultry instead of red meat. The prefix “pollo” is the Spanish word for “chicken.” However, pollotarians eat any type of bird including: chicken, turkey, duck, quail or hen.

  • Pesce-pollotarians: A pesce-pollotarian is a type of pollotarian who occasionally eats fish and seafood.

Do you end up eating some variation of chicken nearly all the time? Congrats on your newly-discovered pollotarian status.

PESCETARIANS (A.K.A. PESCATARIANS)

A pescetarian is a person who primarily eats fish and seafood, as well as vegetables and other non-animal meat foods. “Pesce” means “fish” in Italian and “pesca” means “fishing” in Catalan and Spanish.

  • Pollo-pescetarians: A pollo-pescetarian is a type of pescetarian who occasionally eats poultry.

During Lent, many Catholics observe fasting & abstinence by following pescetarianism (as fish is considered “ok”) on Ash Wednesday and Fridays.

Do you avoid red and white meat, but occasionally eat fish, sushi and other seafood? If so, that makes you a pescetarian.

VEGETARIANS

A vegetarian (a.k.a. herbivore) is a person who does not eat any type of meat and eats a plant-based diet instead.

  • Fruitarians: A fruitarian is a type of vegetarian who primarily eats fruits, nuts and seeds.
  • Ovo Vegetarians: An ovo vegetarian is a type of vegetarian who eats eggs, but not dairy.
  • Lacto Vegetarians: A lacto vegetarian is a type of vegetarian who eats dairy, but not eggs.
  • Ovo-Lacto Vegetarians: An ovo-lacto vegetarian or lacto-Ovo vegetarian is a type of vegetarian who eats both eggs and dairy (as well as other animal by-products).  This is the most common type of vegetarian as it is the least restrictive.
  • Flexitarians: A flexitarian (a.k.a. semi-vegetarian) is a type of eater who eats plant-based, but sometimes eats meat.  It is a portmanteau of “flexible” and “vegetarian.”  There are no defined rules for flexitarians.

VEGANS

A vegan is a person who does not eat any animal products or by-products and strictly adheres to a plant-based diet. This is commonly due to ethical or environmental reasons.

  • Beegans: vegans who eat honey
  • Pegans: those who follow both a Paleo diet and follow vegan practices

EATERS BASED ON RELIGION

There are many types of dietary restrictions based on religious laws.  We touched on Catholics and pescetarianism above.  These are the most widely recognized types of eaters based on religion.

KOSHER

People who eat Kosher follow a strict set of Jewish dietary laws. The word “Kosher” means pure or fit for consumption. Orthodox Jews require that foods be prepared by Jews to be considered Kosher. However, this is not a requirement for less strict conservative Jews. Here is a simplified list of Jewish dietary restrictions:

  • can only meat from animals with cloven hooves and that chew their own cud (e.g. cows, veal, lambs, sheep, goats; not pigs and camels)
  • animals must be slaughtered through a Jewish ritual that does not cause the animal pain (i.e. animal must be unconscious or killed instantaneously)
  • only certain birds can be eaten (e.g. chicken, turkey, duck, etc.)
  • dairy can only come from Kosher animals
  • cannot mix dairy and meat (the term “pareve” means no meat or dairy, which is also beneficial to vegans)
  • fish with scales are allowed, but all types of shellfish are prohibited
  • fruits and vegetables must be completely free of infestation
  • wine must come from a Kosher winery

As you can see, eating a Kosher diet does have positive intentions, which is why 92% of people who eat Kosher are not religious Jews.

HALAL

People who eat halal follow Islamic dietary laws. The word “halal” means lawful or permissible. It is the opposite of “haram” which means unlawful or prohibited. Foods are considered halal if they are prepared, made and stored according to Islamic law and do not have specific contents prohibited by Islamic law. These contents that are considered “haram” include:

  • alcohol
  • pig (pork, bacon, ham, etc.)
  • carnivorous animals
  • lard
  • certain gelatins and enzymes
  • stock and tallow
Tags: glossary, profile

Headshots (6)

Category: Headshots
  1. Click the ‘edit profile’ link in your email
  2. Click on the ‘Gallery’ tab
  3. Remove the existing headshot or galley pics by clicking the X
  4. Save your profile (under ‘Submit’ tab)
  5. Go back to ‘Gallery’ and upload new pic(s)
  6. Save your profile again

You’re allowed ONE main headshot and up to TWELVE gallery pics.

If having problems, email pics to media@tvtwins.uk or upload photos to Dropbox.

Tags: photos, profile
Category: Headshots

Email clearly labelled pics to media@tvtwins.uk or upload photos to Dropbox. Failing that you can Whatsapp them to us in ONE go please!!

Tags: photos, profile
Category: Headshots
Here is an example of a nice pic showing both front and back
Here is an example of a nice pic showing both front and back of hands. This will give the CD an initial idea of whether your hands might be suitable before they request more.

Whether you have done hand modelling before or not, we are often asked for hand models, so unless we already have photos of hands on your profile, we don’t have time to chase this work up. So…

  • If you have hand modelling photos, send them to us
  • If you don’t, take some and send them to usAll ages, colours and conditions of hands are needed for a variety of work!

Make sure photos are clearly labelled so we know whose hands they belong to!

HOW TO TAKE PHOTOS

We don’t want hundreds of pics, just 1 or 2 from each model of the front and back of your hands. Preferably have someone else take the shot so both hands can be in one pic per model! Make sure your hands have a clear background behind them; we don’t want any distractions.

Tag: profile
Category: Headshots

All talent will need to provide a copy of their passport.

Take a photo of the full photo pages as pictured, and name them: “Firstname(s) Lastname (passports).jpg”.

Upload to your profile, or email pics to media@tvtwins.uk

Passports are preferable, but if you haven’t got a passport, you can upload a birth certificate or driving licence.

Category: Headshots

If you don’t have headshots, we won’t be able to submit you for any work at all.

Photos don’t have to be professional, just recent, well-framed and well-lit (see HOW TO TAKE A DECENT HEADSHOT)…

  • If you are serious about this as any sort of career or hobby, it’s in your interest to get headshots done.
  • Bad headshots will give the impression you’re not photogenic and therefore not worth booking.

As you can see from our website, a performer’s main headshot is LANDSCAPE (4:3 wide), but we also require gallery pics as 4:3 or 3:4 (landscape or portrait), so if we’ve deleted your chosen headshot and cropped an alternative, please don’t replace it with one we’ve already seen. Stick it in the gallery instead!

REQUIREMENTS

1. MAIN/Joint headshot

This is the most important photo and your main (landscape) profile pic; should be a close-up of siblings together; heads and shoulders; recent, and as near a likeness as possible, i.e. natural. Not edited together! Not taken from above or below – subject to be at eye level with the photographer!

You can submit photos taken on a phone, just consider your surroundings – a plain, white background is best. Frame the pic with both of your heads together.

No hats, sunglasses, school logos, text/image effects… nothing hiding your faces! We also don’t want pouting or posing, glamour shots, sleeping or bath-time photos! Natural, unfiltered and recent please, no filter, effects or flash!

2. Gallery Images: 

Apart from your main headshot, you can also add a further selection of different looks, together and separately. Please include Single headshots, which should be of individual siblings alone, close-up head and shoulders, recent and as near a likeness as possible, i.e. natural; plus full length options.


ONLY HAVE INDIVIDUAL HEADSHOTS?

You profile cannot be published without a joint headshot. Please arrange to get one done as soon as possible.

ONLY HAVE JOINT HEADSHOTS?

Without individual headshots, we can’t submit you for work alone (without your twin).

Email pics to media@tvtwins.uk or upload via Dropbox (new photos only – not pics already on your profile!)

Tag: photos
Category: Headshots

We don’t expect professional headshots from everyone, but we do expect you putting in a little effort to get them looking decent.

Your MAIN HEADSHOT needs to be in landscape (wide 4:3) mode, not portrait or square!

[Source: kirbypartners.com]
  1. The surroundings need to be considered – best with a solid-coloured wall, blue sky or trees behind the model.
    • Tip: If model has light hair, consider a darker background and vice versa.
  2. The model should stand up straight and tall, with shoulders back and chin lifted toward the camera.
    • Tip: Hair should be washed, dry and preferably loose, wear natural make-up and simple clothes.
    • Tip: Twins – heads need to be close! Stand back to back, one behind the other, or face eachother and turn heads towards the camera.
  3. The photographer should hold the camera at eye level (or just below) and the model framed in portrait mode.
    • Tip: A well-placed tripod or stack of books may help prop up the phone!
    • Tip: If shooting indoors, stand about 3 feet from the backdrop, face a window, and place the camera between the window and the model. 

Here’s a helpful video on how to take passport photos on your phone!

Take a selection with various natural facial expressions, and upload to your profile, or email pics to media@tvtwins.uk or upload via Dropbox or ask first if we can accept them on Whatsapp

Here are some examples of what we’re after:

Tags: photos, profile

Casting platforms (3)

Category: Casting platforms

In our opinion and experience, it takes twice as long to discuss matters over the phone than it does in email.

Generally, we are acting as a third party and are negotiating between talent and production companies. Over the telephone we have to make notes of what each is saying and send it back for corroboration. Whereas if you email us, we have all the information at hand to pass directly to/from the production company/talent.

We’re too busy to chat, but if you want to leave a voicemail you’re welcome to and we will email our reply! However, emails will be dealt with before and faster than voicemails!

We understand this is frustrating to some, but we are an internet based agency; we don’t have a physical office you can call into; we work remotely using email.

Category: Casting platforms

Spotlight is the home of casting.

Spotlight connects performers with roles in theatre, television and film productions around the world. Casting professionals choose Spotlight to cast their projects because performers on Spotlight are recognised as the industry’s best. Actors pay an annual subscription. Once registered, TV Twins can submit you directly from the Spotlight board.

IF YOU’RE OVER 18

You may be eligible to join Spotlight as a full member. You’ll need to meet standards based on your experience or training in order to be eligible – find out more about adult membership here.

YOUNG PERFORMERS

A young performer wishing to join Spotlight must be a minimum of 4 years old and under 18. This means you can join as a young performer from the day of your 4th birthday and up until the date of your 18th birthday. To join Spotlight, you will need to be represented by a Spotlight registered agency (e.g. TV Twins) who can send you a secure application invitation to complete or apply on your behalf. Please contact us to request a secure application invitation.

Some recent changes to the age range of Young Performers. Once a Young Performer reaches 18, instead of being invited to renew, they will be offered an upgrade to Performer membership. Over the course of the next year, Spotlight will gradually remove the 18-25 section of the Young Performer membership, so that the renewal email for 18+ will be offering an upgrade instead. 

As twins, we understand the cost of membership is doubled. However, perhaps one twin has a greater interest in performing, therefore one could join Spotlight and we’ll include information regarding their twin on their profile.

There’s also a Bursary Scheme and option to pay monthly.

Already on Spotlight?

New: If you’re a performer wishing to change your agent/representation details, this can now be done by signing into your personal Spotlight account and selecting ‘Manage my agents’. Changes are instant, and you can check your new profile layout afterwards by selecting ‘View my profile’. Please ensure that you have removed any agents that you no longer wish to appear. If you have more than 2 agents then you need to email updates@spotlight.com to request they add TV Twins as your representative.

We follow: Good Practice Guidelines: For Parents, Agents, Casting Directors and Producers

Category: Casting platforms

Casting Callback is a new UK casting platform that works similar to Spotlight, but is free.

In the first 12 months they’ve added 15k actors, 500 casting directors have posted over 5k roles and have 200 agents sign up. In brief, if you join the platform under our agency, we can submit you to any castings you fit the brief for – so long as you’ve uploaded a headshot.

When you first join, you get 30-days *premium* membership, where you can add multiple photos, media reels, etc., thereafter reverts to *standard* membership which only shows one headshot and no media. You’ll still be able to apply to jobs for free, and we will continue to submit you for castings we feel you fit the brief for.

The best way to get to know the service is to create an individual ‘Candidate’ profile, it only takes a minute, and once you’ve added your best headshot we can start submitting you.

Already joined? Email contact@castingcallback.com to request they add TV Twins agency to your profile.

Trouble adding headshots? Click “Edit profile” and then “Images”, or click here to be taken directly to the edit images page. You’ll need one portrait (tall) head & shoulders photo of the named person per profile.

Registration (5)

Categories: Castings, Registration

Please note that TV Twins is committed to equal opportunities for all performers, irrespective of colour, race, religion or belief, ethnic or national origins, gender, marital/civil partnership status, disability or age, religion, sexual orientation, or any other criteria not related to skills or abilities.

Where gender, age, height and or/appearance has been specified on a post, the casting director has confirmed that such characteristics are a genuine occupational requirement of the role.

Category: Registration

Unfortunately no agency can guarantee you work. We represent those we feel we can successfully submit for work, but there is no guarantee. We also expect you to respond quickly to our messages and inform us of any changes to your situation.

Most castings/shoots are in London, with lots in Manchester and Glasgow. Whilst Casting Directors expect you to attend castings – usually with less than a day’s notice and at your cost – some will accept self-tapes, so it’s important you record an intro video.

So, whilst we’re proactive informing you of castings and putting you forward, we expect you to be proactive in responding to our emails and keeping your profile and headshots up to date!

Categories: Fees, Registration

Nothing! It is free to join TV Twins and use our services. We only take commission on jobs we secure. See our Terms and Conditions for commission rates.

Artists are required to cover their own expenses such as Spotlight entry, Actors Equity subscriptions, headshots and show/audio reels, travel to auditions when expenses are not covered by production.

Tags: fees, registering
Categories: Castings, Registration

Members must choose to receive castings calls. If you don’t want Instant posts, choose Digest. Here are the options:

  • Under 6s – castings for all twins and singletons aged 0-5 years
  • Under 16s – castings for all twins and singletons aged 6-15 years
  • Over 16s – castings for all twins and singletons aged 16+ years
  • Families – castings requiring real family connections of all ages
  • Digest – Twice weekly emails with all the latest castings

Public subscribers can choose to receive weekly Digest posts.

Filter Emails

We do send quite a lot of emails so advice you to set up a filter in your email client.

Why?

  1. So they don’t clutter up your inbox
  2. So you don’t miss something important

How?

  1. Create rules to filter your emails – Gmail
  2. Filter emails in Mail on iPhone
  3. How to organize Outlook email using folders and rules
  4. How To Filter Emails In Hotmail To Clean Up Your Inbox

Your email client not listed? Google it, or reply and we’ll see what we can find for you 🙂

Category: Registration

Once your profile is live, you need to know how we work! Please read below and refer back to!

Check your headshots are appropriate as we may add you to other casting sites we use, where we submit you for roles without contacting you first.

How castings work:

1. YOU APPLY – We post jobs directly to our members, sometimes on our website, social media and WhatsAppand when we’ve time, send you a nudge to read these if we feel you fit the brief.

You need to apply directly if you’re available and interested in being submitted.

2. AUTO SUBMITTED – Production Companies scan our website and shortlist the talent they’re interested in OR we submit our Spotlight and Casting Callback talent directly through those platforms – you need to be members first, so sign up if you can.

You will only hear about these if you are shortlisted or invited to audition.

So check casting calls regularly and follow us on social media 🙂

Applying for jobs

  • Apart from Spotlight and Casting Callback members, we don’t automatically submit you for roles; you need to apply via an application form which you’ll find below each brief.
  • Some Production Companies prefer to make their own selections and we’ll contact you if selected – you need a LIVE profile for this though!
  • Please do check the post date of jobs and casting/shoot dates before applying as they are time-limited. It’s always best to respond quickly. So check your email often, and/or follow us on social media as some jobs are shared there (links below).

Check your email regularly as this is how we contact you about jobs and auditions (usually with little notice) and reply! Failure to reply may cause your profile to be deactivated or deleted.

Add @tvtwins.uk to your ‘whitelist’ so we don’t go into your spam folder! We have a virtual office so we’re not on hand to take phone calls – please use email at all times.


Add family and friends

Register other family members, who may want to get involved in shoots requiring real, true life connections, such as:

  • singleton (such as a sibling, partner or parent)
  • couple (such as two parents or two siblings)

Singletons have their own profile, couples share a joint one, all are linked to the twins profile, and we can put you all forward for work – as individuals or together.

Register now so that when a relevant casting call comes up, profiles are ready to be submitted – don’t wait for a relevant brief!! 🙂


Filter messages

We will always email you but if you want us to WhatsApp you too, create a WhatsApp group with all listed on this profile and TV Twins (+44 7752440376) and send a short message to open the group.

We do send quite a lot of emails so advice you to set up a filter in your email client.

Why?

  1. So they don’t clutter up your inbox
  2. So you don’t miss something important

How?

  1. Create rules to filter your emails – Gmail
  2. Filter emails in Mail on iPhone
  3. How to organize Outlook email using folders and rules
  4. How To Filter Emails In Hotmail To Clean Up Your Inbox

Your email client not listed? Google it, or reply and we’ll see what we can find for you 🙂

Self-taping (5)

Category: Self-taping

For parents/guardians of Young Performers who are feeling a bit new to the art of self-taping, this article is for you! Written by Nicholas Peel, who has mountains of experience in this field, the article guides you through. From the bare necessities, to tips on filming, lighting and sound and finally, editing and sending your file. 

https://www.spotlight.com/news-and-advice/tips-and-advice/self-taping-tips-for-young-performers/

Category: Self-taping

Good practice for self-taping is to record a very short introductory video of yourselves together – please do this as twins rather than separately, and make no mention of any castings – this is for your profile and we can only accept ONE tape!

Use the tips set out at HOW TO SELF TAPE then…

  1. Prepare yourself – imagine you’re going to a real casting, photoshoot or even going on a night out!
  2. Sitting comfortably with both of you in shot, camera in landscape mode, introduce yourselves or one another (to the camera), and state that you’re recording an introductory video for TV Twins.
  3. Continue by chatting to eachother briefly about your amusing experiences and what it’s like to be twins; what you have in common and what separates you.

    Important things to include:
    • your full name(s) and agent (TV Twins)
    • your age and current height(s)
    • where you’re from and/or live
    • type of twins you are (if applicable)
    • any previous experience, or skills/hobbies

It should last no more than 2-minutes please!

Upload directly from your smartphone to Vimeo (with the ability to download enabled), or use a service like DropboxWe Transfer or Mail Big File to send exported files to media@tvtwins.uk and we’ll include it on your profile for Casting Directors and Production Companies to view.

Camera/phone should NOT be hand held. Please rest it on a steady surface and film in landscape mode.

Category: Self-taping

Unless specifically requested, please submit only one video. If you have recorded multiple videos please join them together into one video file using the Photo App on Windows 10 or Quicktime Player on the Mac

Windows 10Merging videos with Photos App

Mac OSXMerging Videos with Quicktime Player

To reduce the size of your video we recommend using a free program for either Windows or OSX called Handbrake. It can be downloaded at here.

Now practice by recording an intro to yourselves…

Categories: Castings, Self-taping

If you’ve been asked to self-tape, we want to ensure you have all the information you need. If you’re taping as identical twins, you need to look alike!

Read FAQs prior to starting each audition!

  1. Tapes should be in landscape mode, with camera/phone resting on a steady surface – never handheld – framing head and shoulders at eye level – we need to see your eyes and face – in a well lit room (light in-front not behind you!). We want to see you clearly.
  2. Do not SHOUT and do not rush – friendly and confidently (see taping lines below). Listen back to your tape and if muffled or sound not clear, redo tape with mic closer!
  3. Always start with a short ident and send one headshot/selfie taken at time of taping.
  4. Read the instructions from the Casting Director thoroughly and check the deadline – try to submit media in good time so agent can preview and ask you to redo if needed.
  5. Do not include anything not requested and trim tapes to shortest possible timings.
  6. If relevant, state that you’re available for all dates (highlight non-availability), and whether you have any commercial conflicts.

If you’re asked to tape lines:

  • We know sometimes scripts appear huge, but it’s best to memorize any lines and be off-book when auditioning.
  • We don’t want to hear anyone else reading your lines, but someone else can read other lines off-camera, but close enough so we can hear them.
  • Lines could be propped up next to the camera so we still see your eyes and face while speaking them. But after repeating lines a few times, you’re sure to pick them up and be off-book!

If you’re asked to complete any forms:

If asked to complete forms, do not provide ANY personal contact details for yourself! Instead, use the following:

Uploading media:

All FILES must be renamed: “Full Name(s) – ROLE – TV Twins” else risk not being submitted – see How to rename files or Search.

We cannot accept HEVC/HEIF files (change camera settings to ‘most compatible’). Max size 500mb.

Upload everything requested to TV Twins links below – not direct to the Casting Director (unless specifically requested otherwise by us) as we need to check everything over first!

Please let us know when you have completed uploading your audition files!

Category: Self-taping

Camera/phone should NOT be hand held or move about.
Rest it on a steady surface and film at eye-level in landscape mode!!

When asked to tape a separate slate (or ident) along with your audition self-tape, the Casting Director generally wants a very short video, shot in landscape mode, consisting of:

A close-up, head and shoulders, eye-level frame of performer(s), stating*:


“Hi, my name is Freda Bloggs
My agent is TV Twins
I’m 12 years old and 5ft 6 from Newcastle but live in London
This is my identical twin sister, First Name…”

“I’ve been in one supermarket commercial in the last 3 years and I’m fully available”


  1. Full name and agent
  2. Age and current height
  3. Where you’re from and/or live
  4. Type of twins (if applicable)
  5. Specify any commercial conflicts and/or dates of unavailability (if applicable)
  6. If requested, capture profiles without moving the camera: video a full length shot of performers facing front, then turning to each side – count to at least 2 before turning, and a 2-second close up of your hands (front and back)! Twins should perform these actions together to shorten the video time!

See also this useful advice – https://www.backstage.com/uk/magazine/article/what-is-an-ident-auditions-76755